MY KENTUCKY: A Christmas Miracle

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Danville, Kentucky was the scene of a Christmas miracle that changed the world of medicine, particularly for women. On December 25, 1809, Dr. Ephraim McDowell removed a 22.5-pound cystic ovarian tumor from Jane Todd Crawford, the world first ovariotomy and successful abdominal surgery. Physicians in Green County,…

MY KENTUCKY: Earthquake!

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. About 2:15 a.m. on December 16, 1811, the initial New Madid earthquake occurred followed by a series of quakes and aftershocks that continued through February 7, 1812. Combined with the appearance of Halley’s Comet earlier in 1811 and the horrific Battle of Tippecanoe, the event was enough…

MY KENTUCKY: Our Soldier of Misfortune

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Few Kentuckians know the name Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, yet he was associated with one of the most significant events in America’s 20th Century history in circumstances that unfortunately left him out of history for more than 75 years. On December 7, 1941, the Henderson native was…

MY KENTUCKY: Billy Vaughn’s magical melodies

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Riding the wave of success as one of the founding members of The Hilltoppers, Glasgow native Billy Vaughn became music director of Dot Records in 1954. By December 1 of that year, his recording of “Melody of Love” had soared in popularity to enjoy a 27-week run…

MY KENTUCKY: Carry A Nation for Prohibition

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Describing herself as “a bulldog running along at the feet of Jesus, barking at what He doesn’t like,” Kentucky native Carrie Amelia Moore Nation, became a prominent figure in America’s toward prohibition of alcoholic beverages. Born in Garrard County on November 25, 1846, she had an imposing…

MY KENTUCKY: Berryman’s bear becomes an icon

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On November 16, 1902, Woodford County, Kentucky native Clifford Berryman’s cartoon of President Theodore Roosevelt on a Mississippi bear hunt was published and led to the creation of the Teddy Bear. Mississippi Gov. Andrew H. Longino invited Roosevelt on the expedition but after three days of hunting,…

MY KENTUCKY: Cassius M. Clay’s “child-wife,” Dora

By SAM TERRY Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On November 13, 1894, “The Lion of White Hall,” 84-year old Cassius M. Clay married 15-year old Dora Richardson at his Madison County estate. The wedding became one of the most memorable stories in Kentucky history. The Louisville Courier-Journal and the Lexington Transcript carried front page news…

MY KENTUCKY: Shryock designs a new Capitol

By SAM TERRY Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. During the autumn of 1824 it seemed a dark cloud hovered over Kentucky’s seat of government. Joseph Desha was inaugurated as the Commonwealth’s eighth governor, setting in motion one of the most chaotic administrations in history. Just two months into Desha’s term, the statehouse burned to the…

MY KENTUCKY: C6H0 – Centre beats Harvard

By SAM TERRY Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. While it may be a treasured tale from 96 years ago, “C6H0” remains emblazoned on surfaces on the campus of Centre College in Danville, Kentucky. It was on October 29, 1921 that Centre defeated Harvard in what the New York Times called “arguably the upset of the…

MY KENTUCKY: Maxwell House Coffee’s Kentucky Roots

By SAM TERRY Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Sunday, October 22 marks the 110th anniversary of President Theodore Roosevelt famously requesting a second cup of coffee while dining at Nashville’s fashionable Maxwell House Hotel and commenting that it was “good to the last drop.” Roosevelt’s quip was seized upon by two southern Kentucky natives –…