MY KENTUCKY: The Commonwealth’s Golden Day

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Few Americans today realize that our federal government began operating under the 1789 U.S. Constitution on March 4. While July 4 was our Declaration of Independence from Great Britain, March 4 was the birth of our national government and the date was honored for 140 years as…

MY KENTUCKY: Sousley raises the flag at Iwo Jima

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Pvt. Franklin Runyon Sousley, a native of Hill Top in Fleming County Kentucky was one of the six U.S. Marines who raised the American flag on the crest of Mount Suribachi on February 23, 1945 during the Battle for Iwo Jima. Joe Rosenthal, an Associated Press photographer,…

MY KENTUCKY: A Wilderness Mystery

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. While the legacies of pioneer explorers such as Daniel Boone, George Rogers Clark, and Simon Kenton are well-known, James Harrod’s story remains one of Kentucky history’s great mysteries. February 21 will mark the 226th anniversary of the disappearance of the founder and namesake of Kentucky’s first settlement.…

MY KENTUCKY: Teddy enshrines Honest Abe

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. President Theodore Roosevelt, his wife Edith and daughter Ethel arrived in Hodgenville, Kentucky where an estimated 3,000 people awaited their arrival on February 12, 1909. The date was the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth which was observed with the placement of the cornerstone of the first…

MY KENTUCKY: Rowan leaves his mark on history

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Long before the Bardstown historic site, known familiarly as “My Old Kentucky Home” was associated with Stephen Foster and his legendary song, “Federal Hill” was the home of the Rowan family, one steeped in Kentucky rich and colorful history. Unfortunately, the Rowans have been overshadowed by the…

MY KENTUCKY: Floyd Collins becomes world news

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On January 30, 1925, Floyd Collins entered Sand Cave to continue his explorations and became trapped in a narrow crawlway, 55 feet below ground. The rescue operation to save Collins became a national newspaper sensation and one of the first major news stories to be reported using…

MY KENTUCKY: Flying high with Willa Brown

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. While she is one of the most influential Kentuckians of the 20th century, Glasgow native Willa Beatrice Brown is unfortunately one of the least known. Born in Glasgow on January 22, 1906, Brown became the first African – American woman to earn a commercial pilot’s license in…

MY KENTUCKY: Emancipation from Illiteracy

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Kentucky educator Cora Wilson Stewart devised a way “to emancipate from illiteracy those enslaved in its bondage” when she conceived the first “Moonlight School” in 1911. A novel idea, Stewart created a learning opportunity for Kentucky adults who could not read or write by holding evening classes…

MY KENTUCKY: Women head to the voting booth

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On January 6, 1920, Kentucky became the 23rd state to officially ratify the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution giving women the right to vote. The Commonwealth’s new governor, Edwin P. Morrow, had been in office less than thirty days when he signed the bill ratifying…

MY KENTUCKY: The Invincible Zerelda Cole James

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc, A native of Woodford County, 16-year old Zerelda Cole married Robert James, a college student, in Stamping Ground on December 28, 1841. Within a year, the newlyweds moved to Clay County, Missouri where they had four children – Alexander Franklin, Robert who died as an infant, Jesse…