MY KENTUCKY: Emancipation from Illiteracy

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Kentucky educator Cora Wilson Stewart devised a way “to emancipate from illiteracy those enslaved in its bondage” when she conceived the first “Moonlight School” in 1911. A novel idea, Stewart created a learning opportunity for Kentucky adults who could not read or write by holding evening classes…

MY KENTUCKY: Women head to the voting booth

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On January 6, 1920, Kentucky became the 23rd state to officially ratify the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution giving women the right to vote. The Commonwealth’s new governor, Edwin P. Morrow, had been in office less than thirty days when he signed the bill ratifying…

MY KENTUCKY: The Invincible Zerelda Cole James

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc, A native of Woodford County, 16-year old Zerelda Cole married Robert James, a college student, in Stamping Ground on December 28, 1841. Within a year, the newlyweds moved to Clay County, Missouri where they had four children – Alexander Franklin, Robert who died as an infant, Jesse…

MY KENTUCKY: A Christmas Miracle

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Danville, Kentucky was the scene of a Christmas miracle that changed the world of medicine, particularly for women. On December 25, 1809, Dr. Ephraim McDowell removed a 22.5-pound cystic ovarian tumor from Jane Todd Crawford, the world first ovariotomy and successful abdominal surgery. Physicians in Green County,…

MY KENTUCKY: Earthquake!

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. About 2:15 a.m. on December 16, 1811, the initial New Madid earthquake occurred followed by a series of quakes and aftershocks that continued through February 7, 1812. Combined with the appearance of Halley’s Comet earlier in 1811 and the horrific Battle of Tippecanoe, the event was enough…

MY KENTUCKY: Our Soldier of Misfortune

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Few Kentuckians know the name Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, yet he was associated with one of the most significant events in America’s 20th Century history in circumstances that unfortunately left him out of history for more than 75 years. On December 7, 1941, the Henderson native was…

MY KENTUCKY: Billy Vaughn’s magical melodies

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Riding the wave of success as one of the founding members of The Hilltoppers, Glasgow native Billy Vaughn became music director of Dot Records in 1954. By December 1 of that year, his recording of “Melody of Love” had soared in popularity to enjoy a 27-week run…

MY KENTUCKY: Carry A Nation for Prohibition

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Describing herself as “a bulldog running along at the feet of Jesus, barking at what He doesn’t like,” Kentucky native Carrie Amelia Moore Nation, became a prominent figure in America’s toward prohibition of alcoholic beverages. Born in Garrard County on November 25, 1846, she had an imposing…

MY KENTUCKY: Berryman’s bear becomes an icon

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On November 16, 1902, Woodford County, Kentucky native Clifford Berryman’s cartoon of President Theodore Roosevelt on a Mississippi bear hunt was published and led to the creation of the Teddy Bear. Mississippi Gov. Andrew H. Longino invited Roosevelt on the expedition but after three days of hunting,…

MY KENTUCKY: Cassius M. Clay’s “child-wife,” Dora

By SAM TERRY Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On November 13, 1894, “The Lion of White Hall,” 84-year old Cassius M. Clay married 15-year old Dora Richardson at his Madison County estate. The wedding became one of the most memorable stories in Kentucky history. The Louisville Courier-Journal and the Lexington Transcript carried front page news…