MY KENTUCKY: Walker opens the new west

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Dr. Thomas Walker’s journal entry for April 13, 1750 is the first written record of a non-Native American at the place now known as the Cumberland Gap. He and five other men – Ambrose Powell, William Tomlinson, Colby Chew, Henry Lawless, and John Hughs – set out…

MY KENTUCKY: The Kentucky Tragedy

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Robert Penn Warren, who would become a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, poet, and literary critic was born in Guthrie, Kentucky on April 24, 1905. While Warren is one of the Commonwealth’s most accomplished offspring, one of his most popular books, World Enough and Time (published 1950) is based…

MY KENTUCKY: Baseball’s Kentucky Colonel

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On April 16, 1925, Earle Bryan Combs, a native of Pebworth in Owsley County, Kentucky made his debut with the New York Yankees, beginning a major league baseball career that would last until 1935. Combs began playing baseball as a youngster using tree limbs and balls made…

MY KENTUCKY: Football in a cow pasture

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On April 9, 1880 Centre College and Kentucky University (Kentucky’s A&M College that later reverted to its historic name of Transylvania University) played the first football game in Kentucky. Some historians believe it was the first intercollegiate football game played in the south, others think it was…

MY KENTUCKY: The Swedish Nightingale’s Visit

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. “Lind Mania” was the term the American press used to describe the immense popularity of Jenny Lind as she traveled through the country on a tour that included Kentucky’s cave region. Known as the “Swedish Nightingale,” Lind was highly regarded as a vocalist of immense talent whose…

MY KENTUCKY: Fabulous history-makers

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Seventy years ago this month Coach Adolph Rupp’s legendary basketball team, “The Fabulous Five,” ushered in a new era in University of Kentucky sports. Rupp boasted that the team was “the greatest basketball team of all time.” The celebrated quintet consisted of forward Wallace “Wah-Wah” Jones, guards…

MY KENTUCKY: Westward ho!

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. The spring of 1775 was filled with momentous events in America, most related to tensions between the American colonies and their Mother Country: Patrick Henry delivered his famous words “Give me liberty or give me death,” Paul Revere made his legendary ride to warn of approaching British…

MY KENTUCKY: Duncan Hines recommends Col. Sanders’ Cafe

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Bowling Green native Duncan Hines published a new edition of his guidebook, Adventures in Good Eating, on March 11, 1939. As a salesman traveling across America in the 1930s, Hines began keeping notes on good places to eat along the country’s highways. Initially, Hines and his first…

MY KENTUCKY: The Commonwealth’s Golden Day

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Few Americans today realize that our federal government began operating under the 1789 U.S. Constitution on March 4. While July 4 was our Declaration of Independence from Great Britain, March 4 was the birth of our national government and the date was honored for 140 years as…

MY KENTUCKY: Sousley raises the flag at Iwo Jima

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Pvt. Franklin Runyon Sousley, a native of Hill Top in Fleming County Kentucky was one of the six U.S. Marines who raised the American flag on the crest of Mount Suribachi on February 23, 1945 during the Battle for Iwo Jima. Joe Rosenthal, an Associated Press photographer,…