My Kentucky

MY KENTUCKY: Unveiling Abe

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. In recent years it has become commonplace for many Americans to revisit the Civil War, its various causes, and the ways in which the event and people associated with it are remembered. Needless to say, the modern debate has been unruly, especially considering the event was over…

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MY KENTUCKY: Angels on Horseback

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Recognizing the dreadful lack of medical resources for more than 10,000 people living in isolated areas of eastern Kentucky, Mary Breckinridge founded the Frontier Nursing Service on May 28, 1925. Born into one of the most illustrious Kentucky families in 1881, she was the granddaughter of former…

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MY KENTUCKY: The Original Mother’s Day

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. People everywhere will be observing Mother’s Day on Sunday and a West Virginia woman will be lauded as the creator of the holiday while the Kentucky woman who was the true author and originator of the idea will be forgotten. Few Kentuckians will recall that our day…

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MY KENTUCKY: Our Magnificent Battleship

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. May 15, 1900 – The USS Kentucky was commissioned for service in the United States Navy. The Newport News Shipbuilding Company of Virginia laid down her keel on March 30, 1896. She was launched on March 24, 1898, sponsored by Miss Christine Bradley, daughter of Gov. William…

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MY KENTUCKY: Hail, our festival day

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. The first Saturday in May is upon us – Kentucky’s day of days, the likes of which there is no other. The Kentucky Derby traces its roots to May 17, 1875 when an estimated 10,000 people gathered for the opening day of racing at the Louisville Jockey…

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MY KENTUCKY: Walker opens the new west

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Dr. Thomas Walker’s journal entry for April 13, 1750 is the first written record of a non-Native American at the place now known as the Cumberland Gap. He and five other men – Ambrose Powell, William Tomlinson, Colby Chew, Henry Lawless, and John Hughs – set out…

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MY KENTUCKY: The Kentucky Tragedy

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. Robert Penn Warren, who would become a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, poet, and literary critic was born in Guthrie, Kentucky on April 24, 1905. While Warren is one of the Commonwealth’s most accomplished offspring, one of his most popular books, World Enough and Time (published 1950) is based…

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MY KENTUCKY: Baseball’s Kentucky Colonel

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On April 16, 1925, Earle Bryan Combs, a native of Pebworth in Owsley County, Kentucky made his debut with the New York Yankees, beginning a major league baseball career that would last until 1935. Combs began playing baseball as a youngster using tree limbs and balls made…

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MY KENTUCKY: Football in a cow pasture

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. On April 9, 1880 Centre College and Kentucky University (Kentucky’s A&M College that later reverted to its historic name of Transylvania University) played the first football game in Kentucky. Some historians believe it was the first intercollegiate football game played in the south, others think it was…

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MY KENTUCKY: The Swedish Nightingale’s Visit

By Sam Terry Managing Editor Jobe Publishing, Inc. “Lind Mania” was the term the American press used to describe the immense popularity of Jenny Lind as she traveled through the country on a tour that included Kentucky’s cave region. Known as the “Swedish Nightingale,” Lind was highly regarded as a vocalist of immense talent whose…

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